Centrifugal Fans

Centrifugal Fans

A centrifugal fan is a mechanical device for moving air or other gases in a direction at an angle to the incoming air. Centrifugal fans often contain a ducted housing to direct outgoing air in a specific direction or across a heat sink; such a fan is also called a blower fan, biscuit blower, or squirrel-cage fan (because it looks like a hamster wheel). These fans increase the speed and volume of an air stream with the rotating impellers

Centrifugal fans use the kinetic energy of the impellers to increase the volume of the air stream, which in turn moves against the resistance caused by ducts, dampers and other components. Centrifugal fans displace air radially, changing the direction (typically by 90°) of the airflow. They are sturdy, quiet, reliable, and capable of operating over a wide range of conditions

Centrifugal fans are constant-displacement or constant-volume devices, meaning that, at a constant fan speed, a centrifugal fan moves a relatively constant volume of air rather than a constant mass. This means that the air velocity in a system is fixed even though the mass flow rate through the fan is not

Centrifugal fans are not positive-displacement devices and centrifugal fans have certain advantages and disadvantages when contrasted with positive-displacement blowers: centrifugal fans are more efficient, whereas positive-displacement blowers may have a lower capital cost

The centrifugal fan is one of the most widely used fans. Centrifugal fans are by far the most prevalent type of fan used in the HVAC industry today. They are often cheaper than axial fans and simpler in construction. They are used in transporting gas or materials and in ventilation systems for buildings and vehicles. They are also well-suited for industrial processes and air pollution control systems.

The centrifugal fan has a drum shape composed of a number of fan blades mounted around a hub. As shown in the animated figure, the hub turns on a driveshaft mounted in bearings in the fan housing. The gas enters from the side of the fan wheel, turns 90 degrees and accelerates due to centrifugal force as it flows over the fan blades and exits the fan housing